At year’s end, hosts Kelvin and Tom are joined by an interactive group of past guests and regular listeners to identify some lessons learned from 2021 as we plan for the new year ahead. See how your perspectives relate to theirs.This is a great episode to share with a colleague and discuss together!

Hosts Tom and Kelvin explore the various perspectives represented in the “Cameras-On vs. Cameras-Off Debate” with an eye toward finding common ground and actionable insights for designing effective synchronous online sessions beyond the emergency ad hoc remote instruction era.

While specialists in online education, such as instructional designers and administrative leaders, help carry out online courses and programs strategically, it is the faculty whose voice, wisdom, and human connections make online learning successful. In this episode, hosts Kelvin and Tom discuss the importance of this faculty voice and valuing.

Renowned guest Dr. Patsy Moskal joins hosts Tom and Kelvin to share key insights from 25 years of conducting research studies and impact evaluation on digital teaching and learning. Grounding our work in this robust body of literature is especially important as we seek to distinguish intentional online learning from ad hoc remote instruction.

Hosts Tom and Kelvin are joined by guest Dr. Julie Mendez to consider how to overcome challenges faced by STEM faculty who might be resistant to teaching online or blended courses. Spoiler: It’s about faculty talking to faculty!

From her time as CAO of Davis College, guest Dr. Cristi Ford joins Kelvin and Tom to talk about the impressive work of Rwanda’s Akilah Institute in providing educational access to women via a combination of blended learning, competency-based education, and international partnership.

Redesigning courses from one modality to another was a rushed necessity in the early days of remote instruction, and it might be an expectation of some administrators post-pandemic. Join hosts Tom and Kelvin as they unpack what listener Jerry Dougherty has termed “intermodal learning.”